“e-bike battery |electric conversion kit for bike”

China is the world’s leading manufacturer of e-bikes, with 22.2 million units produced in 2009. One of the biggest manufacturers of E-bikes in the world is Geoby. Production is concentrated in five regions, Tianjin, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Shandong, and Shanghai.[71] China exported 370,000 e-bikes in 2009.[72]

3. Lastly, I assume if the BMS & battery were able to produce the 50A X 24V watts of 1200W that my electric motor would only ever use the 500W it is rated for? As in the E bikes controller would only draw around 500W?

When it comes to choosing a BMS, the number of cells you have in parallel aren’t important. Only the number of series cells matters. The same BMS will work with 1 or 100 cells in parallel, as the voltage stays the same regardless of the number of parallel cells.

Hi Court, I have recently purchased a new adult tricycle with the intention of converting it to an electric motor. I am feeling a bit overwhelmed with all the different motor options and configurations available. I want something that will provide me with enough power to get up to speed, and have a long ride time. I have seen YouTube videos where they have linked multiple batteries to get extended ride time. What are your recommendations to get a long ride, with the power for a tricycle and a big rider?

Lead-acid batteries are cheap for several reasons: they weigh twice as much as NiMh batteries, and three times as much as lithium batteries. They have much less usable capacity than NiMh batteries or lithium batteries. They only last for half as long as nickel or lithium batteries.

I have now come to the conclusion however that i want a pack that is 48V and capable of running a 1000w motor for atleast an hour. I live in a hilly area, i use a downhill bike (heavy) and im not the smallest guy. Im feeling a bit insecure about putting too many cells in parallel. Through the years i’ve read that the consesus is that more than 4 cells in parallel is a risk. Since a 13S4P pack is about 12Ah (with good batteries) i was wondering if you had any input on how i should move on?

The main limitation of those holders is power – they can’t handle it. For a few amps, they might be fine, but ebikes require dozens of amps, which would surely melt those guys. Think about it this way: professional ebike batteries have big hunks of nickel plate welded between cells. The tiny little spring contacts of those holders will never compare to that kind of current carrying ability.

Some power-on-demand only e-bikes can hardly be confused with, let alone categorised as, bicycles. For example, the Noped is a term used by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario for e-bikes which do not have pedals or in which the pedals have been removed from their motorised bicycle. These are better categorised as electric mopeds or electric motorcycles.

To discover even more great electric bikes, check out the full list of electric bike reviews and electric bike kits which are ordered by date. You can also use the search tool and advanced search options on the right rail of any page to find bikes by brand, model or type.

Dennis bought a 2017 M-850 Addmotor MOTAN Electric Bicycles Sport Orange Super Discount For Sale 500W 48V Bafang Rear Hub Motor 10.4AH Samsung Cell Battery Pack Electric Bike For Big Guys With Fork Suspension And Spring Shock Absorber

Hey, I’m about to build my 16S2P pack from 32 Samsung INR18650-25R cells bought from batterybro.com. How far apart can their voltages be when you connect the parallel packs? They seem to all be charged between 3.52V and 3.56V.

A powerful, well balanced and feature-rich electric cargo bike from Yuba, it offers a wide range of accessories and mounting points for hauling gear, passengers or children. Purpose built frame with internally routed cables, inset battery mount, high-clearance motor interface and smaller……

By 1898 a rear-wheel drive electric bicycle, which used a driving belt along the outside edge of the wheel, was patented by Mathew J. Steffens. Also, the 1899 U.S. Patent 627,066 by John Schnepf depicted a rear-wheel friction “roller-wheel” style drive electric bicycle.[7] Schnepf’s invention was later re-examined and expanded in 1969 by G.A. Wood Jr. with his U.S. Patent 3,431,994. Wood’s device used 4 fractional horsepower motors; connected through a series of gears.[8]

We are pleased to announce that ElectricRider is currently undergoing some major modifications. Many of the products ElectricRider has manufactured for years will soon be provided by a new company whom we’ve selected for their fresh perspective, strong morals and desire to serve the high performance LEV market. We will provide further updates and information here as it becomes available.

Controllers for brushless motors: E-bikes require high initial torque and therefore models that use brushless motors typically have Hall sensor commutation for speed and angle measurement. An electronic controller provides assistance as a function of the sensor inputs, the vehicle speed and the required force. The controllers generally allow input by means of potentiometer or Hall Effect twist grip (or thumb-operated lever throttle), closed-loop speed control for precise speed regulation, protection logic for over-voltage, over-current and thermal protection. Bikes with a pedal assist function typically have a disc on the crank shaft featuring a ring of magnets coupled with a Hall sensor giving rise to a series of pulses, the frequency of which is proportional to pedaling speed. The controller uses pulse width modulation to regulate the power to the motor. Sometimes support is provided for regenerative braking but infrequent braking and the low mass of bicycles limits recovered energy. An implementation is described in an application note for a 200 W, 24 V Brushless DC (BLDC) motor.[44]

First thing is regarding the cells – I have just order some Panasonic 18650PF like yours by chance (I was looking for Samsung). The delivered cells were made and charged in 2014, and the measured voltage now is around 3V (+/- 0.1v). So the http://bestelectricbikebattery.com is basically the same for all of them but there are old, I think, even thaw never used and stored in a warehouse.

Not all gearless direct drive hub motors offer regenerative braking or regen modes because you don’t tend to recoup much energy this way (although it can help reduce wear on brake pads). It’s a neat feature but it costs more to implement and adds complexity to the system. Some ebikes that do offere regen are the Specialized Turbo, all of the Stealth electric bikes and all of the BionX kits and bikes that use them like the Smart electric bike.

So to recap… hub motors operate independently of the rider pedaling, they can be geared or gearless, can fit in the rear wheel, front wheel or even independently from the wheels as with the Organic Transit ELF (though this is very uncommon) and they can sometimes generate electricity. Some drawbacks of all hub motors include increased unsprung weight, which can reduce traction, limit efficiency and strain spokes and rims. They usually have just one gear setting that can operate at a faster or slower speed but cannot shift for improved torque or speed. They also tend to make wheels more difficult to service (changing flat tires or fixing spokes) because they add weight to the wheel and require extra cables to deliver electricity and operation signals (unless they are an all in one hub motor like the FlyKly or Copenhagen Wheel).

Thank you for the article! I am currently making a battery for an electronic skateboard, so I need the layout to be as thin as possible to allow ample room underneath the deck. Currently, I have 6 packs of 3 cells welded in parallel, and would eventually like to create a battery which is 9 cells long, 1 wide, and 2 high, for 18 in total (the two packs of nine would then be welded in series). I am wondering if I could be able to make 2 battery packs by welding 3 of my current 3 cell packs together in parallel to make a long, yet skinny pack, and then welding both packs of nine in series using the alternating system. Essentially, I would be creating a pack that would look like 3 of the ones you show above when making your first series connection. Let me know what you think, and thank you!

Another type of electric assist motor, often referred to as the mid-drive system, is increasing in popularity. With this system, the electric motor is not built into the wheel but is usually mounted near (often under) the bottom bracket shell. In more typical configurations, a cog or wheel on the motor drives a belt or chain that engages with a pulley or sprocket fixed to one of the arms of the bicycle’s crankset. Thus the propulsion is provided at the pedals rather than at the wheel, being eventually applied to the wheel via the bicycle’s standard drive train. An electric mid-drive combined with a hub gear at the back hub may require care due to the lack of a clutch mechanism to soften the shock to the gears at the moment of re-engagement. A stepless / coninuous ratio gear hub or a fully automatic gear hub may reduce the chocks due to the viscosity of oils used for liquid coupling instead of the mechanical couplings of the conventional gear hubs.

36V 10ah Lithium battery (Included with the battery is the charger and mounting Bracket). Standard Fat Wheel 26 in by 4in Front Wheel 500w brushless motor hub (works with disc brakes). Pedal Assistanc…

Sir, Your article does not describe the different methods to activate and control the motors. Do you have a separate article that deals with that? I am hearing about throttle, cadence and torque sensors, and others. Where can one learn about that aspect of the bikes? Thank you.

I like the approach you’re taking, possibly a hardtail with hybrid or knobby tires… the suspension fork adding some comfort along with larger inner tube diameter. When you ride further and at higher average speeds, you tend to feel it in your back and neck more. For this reason, I have become a big fan of full suspension electric bikes… but you can approximate this with a hardtail frame and a seat post suspension. This setup is going to work with standard racks (that tend to stay put compared with beam racks or the Topeak seat stay Pack N’ Pedal rack).

Hi Court, I have a 2005 Giant Trance 2 mountain bike I’d like to convert. I want to commute to work which is 15 miles away using trails and minimal road exposure. There is also a fair amount of hills. The trance has a small triangle and I fell I would need a fairly large battery. I see a 52 volt 20ah at Lunacycle that is a triangle that looks like it will fit but its $600. I’m leaning toward a 1000 watt BBSHD unlocked.. all of this said, I recently rode a fat bike with a BionX hub drive that was so smooth I couldn’t believe it. The BioniX battery would never fit the triangle. Any thoughts or guidance would be appreciated. Thanks

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The battery cells have now been assembled into a larger 36V pack, but I still have to add a BMS to control the charging and discharging of the pack. The BMS monitors all of the parallel groups in the pack to safely cut off power at the end of charging, balance all the cells identically and keep the pack from being over-discharged.

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