“convert electric bike +e bike kits”

Hi Jairus, I really like the BionX D-Series for power, reduced noise and the efficiency of regenerative braking. It’s a high quality kit with throttle and pedal assist mode with a solid warranty. You could also check out the e-RAD kits but they might not work on a recumbent setup. One final option could be the Ridekick but it’s a bit noisier and may be back ordered. Recumbent riders like that one because it doubles for power and storage 😉

I’m glad you enjoyed the article. To answer your questions: I chose this type of battery instead of LiFePO4 mostly because of the cost and convenience. LiFePO4 is a bit more expensive and has fewer options for cells. These Li-ion cells are a bit less expensive and there are dozens of options with many different specifications for any power/capacity need. I’ve used and built LiFePO4 packs before and they have their own unique advantages, but for me they just don’t add up to enough.

Once I’ve got all the cells I need checked out and ensured they have matching voltages, I like to arrange them on my work surface in the orientation of the intended pack. This gives me one final check to make sure the orientation will work as planned, and a chance to see the real-life size of the pack, minus a little bit of padding and heat shrink wrap.

As much as I want to build a pack just for fun and like buying tools like a spot welder I’m afraid of getting crappy cells at a high price. Whatj’s a good cell to charge at 1C for quick turn around and stay at a low price per cell? 36V 12A would be ok, more is a bonus.

If you’re like me, then you like hearing and seeing how things are done, not just reading about them. That’s why I also made a video showing all the steps I took here in one single video. The battery I build in this video is not the same exact battery, but it’s similar. It’s a 24V 5.8AH battery for a small, low power ebike. But you can simply add more cells to make a higher voltage or higher capacity pack to fit your own needs. Check out the video below:

Bionx is the perfect system for moderate to steep hill climbing and instant acceleration. Bionx’s regenerative mode is unique in both its efficiency (up to 15%) and its usefulness—it will automatically slow your bike down when the brake is applied lightly, saving your brake pads and extending riding range per battery charge. Finally, the direct drive motor design allows for extremely reliable performance—the two bearings in the motor are the only wear points—and completely silent operation.

Ebikeschool.com has a lot of great info, but I’ve spent countless hours putting even more info, examples, how to’s, reviews, maintenance steps and buying guides into my book and video course. They are some of the most fact-dense and info-rich ebike resources available today. So check them out to see if they can help you with your own ebike!

craig it should not damage your controller. When you connect two batteries together in parallel it will actually extend the life of both batteries because you are not taking as much of a toll on them when discharging and hopefully not running them down as low.

I buy that pink cells, Samsung ICR18650-26F. The cells have 3,9V, is a little too, only one with 3,82 and the other 3,87. I want to do a pack with 4parallel and 7serie (28 cells), it is acceptable conect them? Any sugestion is welcome.

A fun, classic looking electrified tricycle designed for adults, it’s easy to mount, stable to ride and very adjustable in terms of speed and power, (go from 3 mph to 14 mph or slow reverse). Includes a rubber-coated metal basket that’s perfect for storing groceries, supplies or the included charger……

I should really change that $2 cutoff to more like $2.50, which is more reasonable for quality cells. Basically, the cheapest ‘good’ cells are Samsung 26F cells, which can be had for usually around $2.50 – $2.90 if you are buying in any large quantity, like at least 100. Expect to pay more like $3.00 or so if you’re buying only 40 cells. 26F cells are also limited to 5A discharge though, so you’ve got the same issue as with the NCR18650B cells from Panasonic.

The Panasonic NCR18650B cells you have are very good quality cells. I used similar cells also made by Panasonic, but mine are the NCR18650PF (not B). The difference is that yours have more capacity (mine are 2900mAh, yours 3400mAh) but yours have a lower constant current draw rating. I don’t remember what it is off the top of my head, but I don’t think it’s much more than 5A per cell. So just make sure that you either use enough cells in parallel and/or limit your controller to not draw more power than the cells can handle. Check the cell specification sheet which you can find on Google somewhere to ensure that you are staying within the cells’ limit.

Charge voltage for li-ion cells is 4.2V per cell maximum. So for a 36V 10s battery you’d want to charge it to a maximum of 42V. Charging slightly lower will increase the life of the battery, but isn’t a requirement.

For dd hubs, i think a big drawback is the cogging torque when pedalling unassisted. It may be unnoticable at 5-10mph, but trying cruising at a normal 15 mph and it has “flat” feeling. Freewheel in geared huib abd mid drives roll magnet -free and that should be mentioned, imo.

Case Material:ABS Aluminium alloy. DuraB/Landcrossers Fish E-Bike Battery. Battery Type: Fish Lithium-ion. Fuse Installation position: Inside on the PCB. Fuse Diameter(mm): 5. Fuse Length(mm): 30. http://electricbikemotor.net Li(NiCoMn)O2.

^ European standard NF EN 15194 for Electrically power assisted cycles Archived 2012-12-24 at the Wayback Machine. section 4.2.6.1 Requirements: The maximum [assisted] speed [is] 25 km/h (…) During a production conformity check, the maximum speed may differ by ± 10% from the above-mentioned determined value.

The first major change is the location of the controller outside the motor. As a result, Stromer can put more power into the motor, increasing performance and all but eliminating overheating. The controller itself is redesigned with CANbus communication and more precise motor controls, a big part of the smoothness of the drive.

Come take a test ride on the @stromerbike ST1X in our shop! This bike syncs with your phone to give you full control of your ride! #stromer #stromerbike #stromersmile #electricbike #electricbicycle #pedelec #speedpedelec #nycewheels #swissbike 24.02.2018 – 01:37

The single best manufacturer is BesTechPower, but their BMS’s are really expensive and they have a minimum order quantity of 2. For ‘best bang for your buck’ BMS’s I’d recommend Greentime BMS’s. They are great for most ebike applications outside of serious hotrods and speed machines. I use them on most of my packs.

Hi Court, I have recently purchased a new adult tricycle with the intention of converting it to an electric motor. I am feeling a bit overwhelmed with all the different motor options and configurations available. I want something that will provide me with enough power to get up to speed, and have a long ride time. I have seen YouTube videos where they have linked multiple batteries to get extended ride time. What are your recommendations to get a long ride, with the power for a tricycle and a big rider?

One Reply to ““convert electric bike +e bike kits””

  1. I have a 2015 GNG 48V mid drive, and it starts skipping under heavy load with no pedaling (pulling a bike trailer with a few kids on it). Any idea how I can stop the skipping? I was thinking about looking into a chain guide. One time, I was trying to pedal with the motor, and the chain fell off.
    Regarding your second question: I wouldn’t say the max amperage of the BMS is “dependent” on the controller, but it should be chosen with consideration to the controller. Think of it this way: your controller is what decides how much current your battery is going to supply. The controller is basically pulling that current from your battery. If it’s a 20A controller, that means the most it will pull out of your battery is 20A. So if you plan on riding in a style that uses full power for long periods of time (like hill climbing, dirt riding, etc) then you’ll need to make sure your BMS is rated at least 20A continuous. However, most people that ride on flat roads spend very little time at peak current. My ebike’s controller is a 22A unit, but I spend most of my time around 10-15A when cruising. A 20A continuous BMS would be good insurance in that case, because it means my BMS is rated to handle more continuous power than I generally will pull through it.

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